FREE TO AIR
Part 2 of 4
Freedom from Want

Introduction

FREE TO AIR
Exhibitions, artists' talks and
screenings exploring the
multiple meanings of freedom
in contemporary society

September –
October 2010

Free to Air is an ongoing series of exhibitions and events, which takes as its starting point Roosevelt’s famous ‘four freedoms’ – freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom from want and freedom from fear. The project sets out to explore some of the multiple meanings of ‘freedom’ in contemporary society. For 2010, the theme of ‘freedom from want’ will be reflected in a major new commission and a programme of associated screenings and artists’ talks across London.

The centre-piece of the 2010 programme was 'Crystal & Flame', a new video installation by London-based artist Ergin Çavuşoğlu. The piece was commissioned and presented in collaboration with PEER, and shown also, in a single-screen format, in partnership with Better Bankside and artsdepot.


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Exhibition

CRYSTAL & FLAME
A newly commissioned video
installation by Ergin Çavuşoğlu,
presented at PEER Gallery,
Better Bankside and Artsdepot
Ergin Çavuşoğlu – 'Crystal & Flame'

‘Crystal & Flame’ is a multi-channel installation by artist Ergin Çavuşoğlu commissioned for this year's Free to Air project. It comprises three sets of imagery: the flame grill at a Turkish café; a gem-cutter handling precious stones; and a group of actors rehearsing in a theatre space.

Shot on location across London, it continues a series of works by the artist in which everyday rituals or actions are prefigured by motifs from well-known literary sources. Here, Çavuşoğlu draws his inspiration from a quote by the novelist Italo Calvino, in which the properties of fire and the phenomenon of crystallisation are held up as exemplars of competing natural forces that echo many of the energies at work in the hubbub of the contemporary city.

‘Crystal & Flame’ was commissioned and presented in partnership with PEER and funded, as part of Free to Air, by London Councils.

The exhibition was presented at:

PEER, London

16 September – 30 October 2010


Better Bankside Pop-Up space, London

29th September – 10th October 2010


artsdepot, London

4th – 15th October and
18th – 21st October 2010

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The interplay between these discrete visual elements, and the underlying impulses that shape them, constitutes the basis of Çavuşoğlu’s work. On one of three separate video screens, we are welcomed into the interior of a small Turkish café in North London – a home-from-home for its regular clientele, where the day-to-day sustenance of simple food is amplified by the warmth of human company. As the short-order cook rakes the coals of a rudimentary brazier, we witness the coming together of a group of friends at one of the restaurant tables – the internal dynamics of the relationship between them becoming increasingly evident through their body language and the patterns of their conversation.

In another section of the installation, Çavuşoğlu contrasts the rhythms and inflections of these informal interactions with the cold, hard surface of a precious stone that is being cut and polished. A symbol of the ineffable and the eternal, and an index of worldly wealth, this gleaming gem is also a reminder of the former diamond trade of the old east end of London; now almost gone, as the city, in the heat and flux of its continual transformation, has re-forged and re-made itself.

These parallel scenes are counterpointed by a third component that shows a group of actors rehearsing an adaptation of a short story by Chekhov. In the story, the utopian political sentiments of its artist-narrator are examined against the harsh realities of peasant life and subsequently challenged from the perspective of memory. As the actors and director go back over their lines, adding extra nuance and emphasis, the naturalism of the language is itself polished and honed, in pursuit of a lucidity of expression that both reflects and goes beyond the reality of the moment.

The setpiece statements of the protagonists (reworked from the Chekhov original by screenwriter Arnold Barkus) revisit a discrepancy that often exists between what people want and what they might actually need. As the actors discuss these motivating factors to help them get inside the mind of their characters, Çavuşoğlu’s emblematic tableaux (icons of conspicuous consumption offset with images of straightforward, albeit fleeting fulfilment) embellish both sides of the argument.

‘Crystal & Flame’ was commissioned as part of Free to Air, an ongoing project, funded by London Councils, which looks at the four fundamental freedoms: freedom of expression, freedom from want, freedom of religion and freedom from fear. The context for this year’s commission was to consider the contemporary significance of ‘freedom from want’ in one of a number of ways, ranging from the economic disparity that continues to characterise life in the capital, to the material improvements it is able to support, to the dreams and desires it promotes (and which it is not always able to satisfy).

Commissioned and presented by Film and Video Umbrella in collaboration with PEER.



Funded as part of Free to Air by London Councils. Supported by Arts Council England.

Additional in-kind support by Better Bankside, artsdepot and Holts Gems

Gallery Guides for this exhibition are available in Turkish, Bengali, Gujarati, Somali, French and Spanish on request.





Talks & Events

MAKING THE CUT
A programme of artists’ talks
presented at The Showroom
Chelsea College of Art & Design,
The Gate Cinema, Iniva,
Ritzy Picturehouse & Stratford Picturehouse through October 2010
Catch up on the Talks & Events presented as part of Free to Air 2010

Making the Cut
Film and Video Umbrella presented a series of talks and events in which artists from London, known for their innovations with the moving image, showcased new work and discussed their practice. These presentations, collectively entitled ‘Making the Cut’, focused on artists who have made their mark over the last few years, while speculating also on the future of this kind of experimental practice at a time of unprecedented pressure on public funding. Reflecting the breadth and diversity of London’s cultural life, ‘Making the Cut’ was initiated in collaboration with a number of cultural organisations across the capital.







Event 1: Shezad Dawood
in conversation with Sacha Craddock

at Ritzy Picturehouse

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"Playing havoc with unwritten rules that determine boundaries between cultures and people",
Shezad Dawood
’s 'Feature' is a deliriously inventive DIY opus that is also a powerful statement of cinematic intent. Following a screening of the film, Dawood talked about his idiosyncratic methods, and his future ambitions, with critic and curator Sacha Craddock.

This event was held at
Ritzy Picturehouse

on Thursday 7th October.

Main picture: Shezad Dawood, ‘Feature Production Still’, 2008, from super 16 mm and HD, 55 minutes, Courtesy of Paradise Row, London.







Event 2: Leo Asemota
in conversation with Paul Goodwin

at Iniva at Rivington Place

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Leo Asemota
’s forays into film and video are merely one component in an engagingly diverse and highly personal aesthetic. Shining a light on the different aspects of his work, Asemota discussed his motivations and ongoing interests with the curator Paul Goodwin.
This event was held at
Iniva at Rivington Place
on Monday 11th October.





Event 3: Jananne Al-Ani
in conversation with Rachel Withers

at Ritzy Picturehouse

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Jananne Al-Ani
’s portfolio of distinctively spare and elegantly haunting film and video installations has recently been supplemented by a new body of work, 'The Aesthetics of Disappearance: a Land without People'. This introduction to Al-Ani’s practice, including the UK premiere of her latest film, was followed by a conversation with writer and critic Rachel Withers.

This event was held on Tuesday 12th October at
Ritzy Picturehouse


Main picture: Jananne Al-Ani, 'The Aesthetics of Disappearance: a Land without People Still'






Event 4: Gayle Chong Kwan
in conversation with Camilla Brown

at Chelsea College of Art & Design

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Gayle Chong Kwan
’s striking photographic set pieces are rich in images of plenty, even cornucopia, yet are tinged with decay and ruin. As she increasingly introduces the moving image and aspects of movement and the senses into her artistic palette, she talked about these recent developments with Camilla Brown, Senior Curator at The Photographers’ Gallery.

This event was held on Friday 15th October at
Chelsea College of Art and Design


Main picture:'Les Precieuses Still', 2008





Event 5: Zineb Sedira
in conversation with Lucy Reynolds

at The Gate Picturehouse

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In this presentation, Jarman Award 2010 nominee
Zineb Sedira
showcased one of the film works that have brought her increasing attention and acclaim. Highlighting the experience of migration and the legacies of Mediterranean history, 'MiddleSea' is accompanied by extracts from other works by the artist. After the screening Sedira was joined by the writer and critic Lucy Reynolds.

The event was held on Sunday 17th October at
The Gate Picturehouse


Main picture: 'Saphir, Still 2006





Event 6: George Chakravarthi & Campbell
in conversation with Grant Watson

at Iniva at Rivington Place

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George Chakravarthi
de-constructs and re-constructs definitions of gender, racial identity and sexuality within his live performances, photographs and video installations.
Campbell
is a British independent filmmaker who explores historical memory-loss and shame in African diasporic post-colonial cultures. Her work challenges dominant representations of race, sexuality and gender. Each artist presented a selection of their work, followed by a discussion and Q&A with Grant Watson, Senior Curator at Iniva.

This event was held on Monday 18th October at
Iniva at Rivington Place


Main picture: George Chakravarthi 'Untitled' Still





Event 7: Ergin Çavuşoğlu
in conversation with Chris Darke

at artsdepot

Read More


Ergin Çavuşoğlu
was the recipient of this year's Free to Air commission, and the project that resulted, 'Crystal & Flame', was exhibited during September and October, as a three-screen installation and as a single-channel film. Following a special screening of the film, Çavuşoğlu talked about his work with the writer, Chris Darke.

This event was held on Wednesday 20th October at
artsdepot


Main picture: 'Crystal & Flame' Still, 2010





Event 8: The Otolith Group & Mirza & Butler
in conversation with Emily Pethick and Steven Bode

at The Showroom

Read More

2010 Turner Prize nominees Kodwo Eshun and Anjalika Sagar of
The Otolith Group
joined forces with
Karen Mirza and Brad Butler
from no.w.here and discussed the distinguishing principles of artistic practice that features research, curation and polemic as well as film and video production. Exploring the likely future for such artist-led initiatives, the event was chaired and hosted by curators Emily Pethick and Steven Bode.

This event was held on Thursday 21st October at
The Showroom


Main picture: Mirza & Butler, 'The Museum of Non Participation' Still





Event 9: Sonia Boyce
in conversation with Marcus Verhagen

at Iniva at Rivington Place

Read More


Sonia Boyce
’s vibrant, inspirational innovations in photography, video and audio have offered some of the most engaging and affirming artistic interventions of recent years. Boyce showed a selection of works (including three film pieces 'For you, only you', 'Crop Over' and 'Ho Narro') and brought us up to speed with her practice and future ambitions in the company of critic and art historian Marcus Verhagen.

This event was held on Monday 25th October at
Iniva at Rivington Place


Main picture: 'For you, only you' Still, 2008






Event 10: susan pui san lok
in conversation with Chris Darke

at Stratford Picturehouse

Read More


susan pui san lok
works across moving-image, installation and text, often incorporating archive material into pieces that offer multi-faceted contemporary resonances. This presentation featured extracts from lok’s 'Faster, Higher', made in the highly charged context of the 2008 Beijing Olympics, and ongoing anticipation of London 2012. lok talked about her work with writer and critic Chris Darke.

This event was held on Tuesday 26th October at
Stratford Picturehouse


Main picture: 'Faster, Higher' Still, 2008

Outreach Events

In addition to the public events listed above, ‘Free to Air’ also includes a series of outreach events with local community groups throughout London’s boroughs. Ranging from creative workshops for young people through to a large party with traditional Afghan music and dancing, these events provide opportunities to explore the theme ‘freedom from want’ in a number of different contexts.


Artists

Commissioned Artist

Ergin Çavuşoğlu was chosen by a selection panel
from an open submission process as the artist for
Free to Air 2010.

Ergin Çavuşoğlu
(born Targoviste, Bulgaria, 1968)
lives and works in London. His work has been widely exhibited, with solo presentations at Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst, Aachen; Kunstverein Freiburg; Contemporary Art Centre, Istanbul; and Dundee Contemporary Art, amongst many others. He has contributed to numerous group exhibitions, including at A Foundation, London; LABoral, Gijon, Spain; The New Gallery, Jerusalem; and De Appel, Amsterdam. He was part of the touring exhibition British Art Show 6 and was shortlisted for Artes Mundi 4 in 2010 and the Beck’s Futures Prize in 2004. For more information see
www.ergincavusoglu.com


Development Artists

Each year, as part of Free to Air, two London-based artists are selected by a panel, through an open submission, and are offered the opportunity of a six-month mentoring and research development programme with Film and Video Umbrella. Drawing upon the skills and experience of staff within the organisation, artists are required to identify specific aspects they would like to focus on in order to further develop their practice. Development programmes may vary from acquiring new technical skills or receiving curatorial and presentational feedback. For Free to Air 2010 the panel selected artists Breixo Viejo and Emma Wolukau-Wanambwa.

Breixo Viejo
(born in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, 1976)
lives and works in London and has shown his film and video works internationally. Recent exhibitions include Loop Festival, Barcelona and 5th Athens Video Art Festival, and solo exhibitions at The Gallery, London and Ayala Arts Centre, Madrid. For ‘Free to Air’ 2010, Viejo is developing a new video work, Dreams, which explores ludomania, or addictive gambling, among Latin American communities in London.
www.breixoviejo.com

Emma Wolukau-Wanambwa
(born in Glasgow, Scotland, 1976)
lives and works in London. Her work has been exhibited internationally, including at Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporane, Seville, Spain; Iniva, London; Württembergischer Kunstverein Stuttgart, Germany; and S1 Artspace, Sheffield. Wolukau-Wanambwa undertook an artist’s residency at Camden Arts Centre in 2010, was part of Lux Associate Artists Programme in 2009 and was awarded the Red Mansion Art Prize in 2007.
www.wolukau-wanambwa.net

'Making the Cut' Artists

Shezad Dawood
(born in London, 1974) Shezad Dawood trained at Central St Martin’s and the Royal College of Art before undertaking a PhD at Leeds Metropolitan University. Dawood works across many different forms of media, and much of his practice involves curating and collaboration, frequently working with other artists to build on and create unique networks of critically engaged discursive circles. These networks map across different geographic locations and communities, and are particularly concerned with acts of translation and restaging. For example, his collaborative ‘Feature’ film (2008), which relocated the action of a traditional western to the English countryside, slipping into other sub-genres such as the zombie-flick, and Wagnerian opera (and features cameos from artists Jimmie Durham and David Medalla). Dawood’s work has been exhibited internationally, including as part of Altermodern - curated by Nicolas Bourriaud at Tate Britain, and the 53rd Venice Biennale (both 2009). And his further extensive exhibitions include projects in cities such as: Dubai, Mumbai, New Delhi, Fribourg, Hamburg, Sydney and Singapore. Upcoming projects include the Busan biennale in Korea (2010), collaboration with contemporary dance choreographer Jasmin Vardimon at Sadlers Wells in London (2011), and a feature-length sci-fi film, which will go into production in the summer of 2011. He currently lives and works in London, where he is Senior Lecturer and Research Fellow in Experimental Media at the University of Westminster.
www.shezaddawood.com/



Leo Asemota
Born in Benin City, Nigeria in 1967, Leo Asemota has since gained a reputation for being an exceptionally prolific artist, quietly amassing a body of thoughtful and engaging work across a broad range of media.
Asemota's films have toured South Africa and the United States with screenings at the ICA, The Lux, Curzon Cinema and Riverside Studios in London. The film Cult: making of FiTH WORK #33 (2003) premiered at 198 Gallery, London (March 6 - 8, 2003) highlighting the beginning of a short cycle of films and photographs featuring the artist as subject. Cult is an outstanding and thought provoking work of many-valued logic exploring the generative forms of identity and aesthetics.
FiTH WORK are witty and sublime creations that is a thesis on individuality, popular culture, race, life, death and other pre-occupations. FiTH, an acronym Leo composed meaning 'fever in the head' began in 1999, and are works produced using the idioms of various art forms. The exhibition at The Fount Gallery, London (March 8 - April 20, 2003) was the first showing of works from this inconclusive collection; there are also no multiples in the series, affirming Asemota's rejection of machine -like driven art.
Asemota's photographic work is often described as abstract form combined with Expressionist social comment. The Black & White Case Studies - #1 (2000) and #6 (2003) - of which there will be six are works on the unstable discourse on race and colour, whilst Map of a City (2001) enriches the idiom of documentary photography and bring to bear an approach to the medium that is fresh and sharp. The landscape Leo presents in Map of a City is of the natural and urban environment expanded to incorporate his own physical experience of the world.
Leo Asemota is currently in development on a new film, the second sequence in the short cycle of films featuring the artist as subject.
Leo Asemota’s multifaceted artistic practice is based at EotLA, a modest self-contained complex in London with his studios, publishing enterprise and the Contemporary Rooms project space.
www.eotla.com/

Jananne Al-Ani
Born Kirku Iraq 1966
Al-Ani studied Fine Art at the Byam Shaw School of Art and graduated with an MA in Photography from the Royal College of Art. She has had solo shows at Darat al Funun, Amman; Art Now (Tate Britain) and the Imperial War Museum, London. Recent group exhibitions include Closer, Beirut Art Center and Without Boundary: Seventeen Ways of Looking, Museum of Modern Art, New York and The Screen-Eye or the New Image: 100 videos to rethink the world, Casino Luxembourg. Al-Ani has co-curated exhibitions including Veil and Fair Play. Recipient of the Abraaj Capital Art Prize and the East International Award, her work can be found in public collections among them the Tate Gallery and Imperial War Museum, London; the Pompidou Centre, Paris; the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC and Darat al Funun, Amman. She lives and works in London.
www.lcc.arts.ac.uk/Jananne_Al_Ani_research.htm/

Gayle Chong Kwan
Gayle Chong Kwan works with photography, video, sound, installation, and performance and weaves together documentary and fantastical approaches to explore ideas of collective and individual memory, history and expanded notions of and frustration between the senses. Chong Kwan’s work creates a dialectic universe, highlighting fictional contemporary mechanisms and the flowering of latter day myths. Her mise-en-scene landscapes, installations, and environments are created out of disturbing arrangements of waste, food and found materials. Chong Kwan’s work highlights the ambiguous relationship between reality and appropriation and detoured implications, just as the Grand Tour tried to digest Classicism, mass tourism tries to digest the world in a more superficial and global way – pre-packaged, sweetened and adulterated.
Chong Kwan has shown extensively nationally and internationally. Recent exhibitions include: ‘Whose Map is it? New Mapping by Artists’, Iniva, London; ‘The Grand Tour’, Galerie Kernot, Paris; ‘The Eyes see more than the heart knows’, Peckham Space, London; ‘Memoryscape Moravia’, Centro Cultural de Moravia, Medellin, Colombia; ‘Guest/Visitor Book’, Speakeasy, Word/Play, ICA, London; British Subjects: Identity and Self-Fashioning, 1966-2009, Neuberger Museum of Art, New York; ‘Conversations’, Tate Britain, London; Born in Edinburgh 1973, Chong Kwan lives and works in London. www.gaylechongkwan.com/



Zineb Sedira
Sedira is a French Algerian artist based in London. Her work in video, photography and installation contemplates globalisation and migration, concentrating on negotiations between different environments and different people. By doing so, it frequently highlights overlooked in-between spaces.
The artist has had solo exhibitions at Centre Culturel Français, Algiers; Cornerhouse, Manchester; and Sharjah International Art Biennial, United Arab Emirates. Her work has also featured in international group exhibitions at Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva; Brooklyn Museum, New York; Mori Museum, Tokyo; and the 2007 Thessaloniki Biennale, Greece.
Sedira was shortlisted for the 2010 Jarman Award. She is represented by Galerie Kamel Mennour, Paris. www.zinebsedira.com/



George Chakravarthi
There are many, many examples of literary and visual artists who have adopted alternative personae to apprehend particular experiences, enabling them to physically and intellectually engage with specific discourses or critically interface with the public. The first few examples that come to mind are Marcel Duchamp as Rrose Selavy. Adrian Piper as The Mythic Being, writer Fernando Pessoa and his seventy-two ‘heteronyms’, writer and artist Brian O’Doherty as Patrick Ireland and several others including Cindy Sherman’s many alter-egos; all characters functioning for time-limited or long term strategic purposes. George Chakravarthi has similarly utilized this mode of inquiry and presentation to ‘de’ and ‘re’ construct definitions of gender, racial identity and sexuality within his live performances, photographs and video installations. Chakravarthi considers much of his work to be a series of self-portraits. As a multi-disciplinary artist he draws inspiration from cinema, art history, public and private spaces and from collective social and cultural histories. Chakravarthi engages the viewer with his honest exploration of human emotions, conditions and restrictions. Using experiences from his own life, he often reveals painful situations, memories and experiences with an acute sensibility, cogent perceptions and generous humanity.
He has performed and exhibited nationally and internationally from venues as diverse as The Site Gallery, Royal Academy of Arts, Tate Modern, The Victoria and Albert Museum, UK, Mousonturm, Germany, Kunstnanken, Norway, The Queens Gallery, India to museums and other public sites. He has been has been commissioned by the BBC, Artangel, The Arts Council of England, The British Council, The National Review of Live Art and SPILL Festival of Performance. Currently he is creating a site-specific photographic installation commissioned by The Royal Shakespeare Company for Shakespeare’s Tower in Stratford-Upon-Avon www.georgechakravarthi.co.uk/



Campbell
Campbell is an award-winning filmmaker.
Her titles include the award-winning BD Women (1994), Viva Tabatha (1996) and Paradise Lost (2003). She made Broken Chain (2008) a BBC/Film London in March 2008. Other titles include the award-winning Legacy (2006) which explores a personal take on the lasting impact of slavery on Black families and Fem (2007), a butch homage to queer femininity.
Campbell’s body of work was honoured by the Queer Black Cinema festival in New York in March 2009. Image, Memory and Representation was a retrospective of her work which was programmed at the London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival 2007.
Campbell curated No Heroes as part of the Progress Reports 2010 at Iniva which also screened at the Red Cat Arts Centre in Los Angeles 2010. She was invited to programme the London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival 2004 – 2005. She was also the festival director for The Fire This Time! – Queering Black History Month 2006 which focussed on the work of queer artists of colour for Black History Month.
She has written published short stories and articles on film, sexuality and gender for Diva Magazine, Feminist Review, The Pink Paper, Critical Quarterly, Chroma Magazine, BFM Magazine, Luxonline and BFI Screenonline.
Campbell was Sound Mixer for The OWLS (2010) directed by Cheryl Dunye, DoP for For Cultural Purposes Only (2009) directed by Sarah Wood, Bend It (2008) directed by Jules Nurrish, Camera for feature films Do I Love You? (2002) And Tick Tock Lullaby (2007) directed by Lisa Gornick. www.blackmanvision.com www.blackmanvision.com/



The Otolith Group
Taking its name from part of the inner ear which establishes our sense of gravity and orientation,The Otolith Group is an artist led collective founded by Anjalika Sagar and Kodwo Eshun that integrates film and video making, artists writing, workshops, exhibition curation, publication and developing public platforms for the close readings of the image in contemporary society. The Group’s work is formally engaged with exploring the legacies and potentialities of documentary practice, the essay film, postcolonial archives, cosmopolitan modernisms and science-fictions. Nationally and internationally, the Group have curated and 
co-curated work at film festivals, programmes and exhibitions including the touring exhibition The Ghosts of Songs: A Retrospective of The Black Audio Film Collective 1982-1998, Harun Farocki. 22 Films: 1968-2009 at Tate Modern and the touring programme Protest conceived as part of the Essentials: The Secret Masterpieces of Cinema commissioned by the Independent Cinema Office.
The Group held their two-venue solo exhibition A Long Time Between the Suns: Part I and Part II, which took place at Gasworks and The Showroom, London (2009). Their numerous group exhibitions include British Art Show 7, Nottingham, London, Glasgow and Plymouth (2010), Manifesta 8: The European Biennal of Contemporary Art, Murcia, (2010), Universes in Universe: 29th Sao Paolo Biennal (2010), Star City: The Future under Communism, Nottingham Contemporary (2010), Universal Code, Power Plant, Toronto (2009) Translocalmotion: The 7th Shanghai Biennale (2008), Destroy Athens: 1st Athens Biennial (2007), 2nd International Biennial of Contemporary Art of Seville (2006), New British Art: Tate Triennial (2006) and Homeworks III: A Forum on Cultural Practices, Masrah Al Madina, Beirut (2005). In 2010 The Otolith Group were nominated for the tenth Turner Prize.
www.otolithgroup.org

Karen Mirza and Brad Butler
Karen Mirza and Brad Butler's artistic practice is based on collaboration and dialogue. This manifests itself in a multi-layered practice of filmmaking, drawing, installation, photography, performance, publishing and curating. Their work is engaged with challenging and interrogating terms such as participation, collaboration, the social turn and the traditional roles of the artist as producer and the audience as recipient. Karen Mirza and Brad Butler have been actively involved in the London art scene for over thirteen years and have participated in many exhibitions in leading institutions in Europe and abroad. They recently received the 2009 production grant from the Museum of Contemporary Cinema Foundation Madrid, they were Festival Award winners at The 2010 Chicago Film and Video Festival and were nominated for the 2010 Transmediale Award Berlin. Their current body of work, The Museum of Non Participation, commissioned by Artangel, proposes a museum as a conceptual (geo)political construct of gesture, image and thresholds of language. This ongoing body of work has since been the main feature in Kaleidoscope Magazine, the front cover of Art Monthly and the subject of Future Now Greats in Art Review whilst their first film made in this context The Exception and the Rule has screened in over 16 major international festivals. Karen Mirza and Brad Butler's forthcoming work opens at Vivid in Birmingham on 3rd November 2010 and they are invited artists in residence at Townhouse Gallery in Cairo 2010/11. www.no-w-here.org.uk

Sonia Boyce
Sonia Boyce came to prominence in the early 1980s as a key figure in the burgeoning black British art-scene of that time with artworks that spoke about racial identity and gender in Britain. Since the 1990s Boyce’s practice has taken a more multi-media and socially inclusive approach to bridge cultural differences. Since 1983, she has exhibited extensively throughout the UK and internationally.
Exhibitions and monographs include: Sonia Boyce: Speaking in Tongues, (Gilane Tawadros, Kala Press 1997), Annotations 2/Sonia Boyce: Performance, (Mark Crinson, Iniva - the Institute of International Visual Arts 1998); Video Positive: the other side of zero, Bluecoat Gallery, Liverpool (2000); Recent Sonia Boyce: la, la, la, Reed College, Portland – Oregon (2001); Century City: art and culture in the modern metropolis, Tate Modern, London (2001); Sharjah International Bienal 7, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates (2005); Devotional, National Portrait Gallery, London (2007); Crop Over, Harewood House, Leeds and Barbados Museum & Historical Society (2007/2008), For you, only you (Paul Bonaventura, Ruskin School of Drawing & Fine Art, Oxford University and tour 2007/2008), Praxis: Art in Times of Uncertainty, Thessaloniki Biennal 2, Greece (2009); Like Love, Spike Island, Bristol and tour (publication by the Green Box Press, Berlin, 2010); and Afro Modern, Tate Liverpool and tour, 2010. In 2007, David A Bailey, Ian Baucom and Sonia Boyce jointly received the History of British Art Book Prize (USA) for the edited volume Shades of Black: Black Art in 1980s Britain, published by Duke University Press in collaboration with Iniva and AAVAA – the African and Asian Visual Artists Archive. In the same year she was awarded an MBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List, for her services to art. Boyce is currently an AHRC Research Fellow at Wimbledon College of Art and Design: Centre for Drawing, University of the Arts London, and Associate Professor at Middlesex University, Department of Fine Art. www.iniva.org/library/archive/people/b/boyce_sonia

susan pui san lok
susan pui san lok is an artist and writer based in London, currently Research Fellow in Visual Culture at Middlesex University, and an editor of the Journal of Visual Culture. Working across moving image, installation, sound and text, she has exhibited and published nationally and internationally since the 1990s. Recent solo projects include: Faster, Higher (2008), commissioned by Film and Video Umbrella and the British Film Institute; DIY Ballroom/Live (2007-8), a Cornerhouse ‘Bigger Picture’ national touring commission; and Golden, featuring exhibitions at Beaconsfield, London, and Chinese Arts Centre, Manchester (2006). Group shows include How We Became Metadata (University of Westminster, 2010); Hit the Ground (Hatton Gallery, 2009); Cruel/Loving Bodies (Shanghai Duolun MoMA, Beijing 798 Space, Hong Kong Arts Centre, 2004-6); Reassurance (SPACE Triangle, Chinese Arts Centre, 2005); and Cities on the Move (Hayward Gallery, 1999). She has published various articles, essays, reviews, and three artist books: Faster, Higher (co-edited with Nina Ernst, 2009); Golden (Notes) (2007); and NEWS (2005).
susanpuisanlok.wordpress.com
Venues

PEER
99 Hoxton Street, London N1 6QL
020 7739 8080 / mail@peeruk.org
www.peeruk.org
Opening hours: Wednesday–Saturday 12–6pm
Nearest tube: Old Street


Better Bankside
5 Burrell Street, London SE1 0UN
020 7928 3998 / rb@betterbankside.co.uk
www.betterbankside.co.uk
Opening hours: Monday–Sunday, 11am–5pm
Nearest tube: Southwark / London Bridge

artsdepot
5 Nether Street, Tally Ho Corner, North Finchley
London N12 0GA
020 8369 5454 / www.artsdepot.co.uk
Nearest tube: West Finchley / Finchley Central / Woodside Park

Ritzy Picturehouse
Brixton Oval, Coldharbour Lane, London SW2 1JG
0871 902 5739 / ritzy@picturehouses.co.uk
www.picturehouses.co.uk
Nearest tube: Brixton

Iniva
Rivington Place
, London, EC2A 3BA

020 7749 1240 / bookings@rivingtonplace.org
www.iniva.org
Nearest tube: Old Street / Liverpool Street

Chelsea College of Art and Design
16 John Islip Street, London SW1P 4JU
020 7514 7751 / info@chelsea.arts.ac.uk
www.chelsea.arts.ac.uk
Nearest tube: Pimlico

The Gate Cinema
87 Notting Hill Gate, London W11 3JZ
0871 902 5731 / gate@picturehouses.co.uk
www.picturehouses.co.uk
Nearest tube: Notting Hill Gate

The Showroom
63 Penfold Street, London NW8 8PQ
020 7724 4300 / info@theshowroom.org
www.theshowroom.org
Nearest tube: Edgware Road

Stratford Picturehouse
Salway Road, London E15 1BX
0871 902 5740 / stratfordeast@picturehouses.co.uk
www.picturehouses.co.uk
Nearest tube: Stratford

Contact

For further information on Free to Air please contact:
Film and Video Umbrella
8 Vine Yard, London, SE1 1QL
020 7407 7755 / www.fvu.co.uk

To receive regular updates on Free to Air, including details of exhibitions, events and screenings please enter your email address below:
Partners

Free to Air 2010 is commissioned and presented by
Film and Video Umbrella in collaboration with PEER and is funded by London Councils.

PEER is an innovative, risk-taking independent arts charity whose work has been applauded locally, nationally and internationally. The gallery has a reputation for commissioning and presenting an ambitious range of high quality and often groundbreaking work both in its gallery space and in the public realm. PEER is supported by the Paul and Louise Cooke Endowment.
www.peeruk.org

Better Bankside Crystal and Flame is part of a series of exhibitions and events that will be taking place in Better Bankside’s new Pop Up Space at 5 Burrell Street. This is part of Better Bankside’s long-term strategy to bring a pop up to the area to demonstrate creative uses of spaces and to bring life to unexplored parts of Bankside. 5 Burrell Street is a fully refurbished railway arch owned by Network Rail and is part of a £6 million investment scheme to provide innovative business space throughout the south bank.
www.betterbankside.co.uk

artsdepot’s visual art exhibitions programme showcases local, national and international artists. A variety of media is represented including painting, sculpture, photography, film, installation and digital art. In both the Apthorp gallery and public spaces, artsdepot’s dynamic exhibitions of contemporary artwork seek to reflect the vibrancy and diversity of the Borough it serves.
www.artsdepot.co.uk

Film and Video Umbrella commissions, curates, produces and presents film, video and other moving-image works by artists that are staged in collaboration with galleries and other cultural partners across the UK. The organisation usually commissions 5-6 projects every year.

 Since the late 1980s, Film and Video Umbrella has been at the forefront of this vibrant and expanding area of practice, promoting innovation through its support of some of the most exciting figures on the contemporary scene. During this time, the organisation has commissioned and produced over 100 different artists’ projects, ranging from ambitious multi-screen installations to shorter film and video pieces, as well as numerous online commissions.
www.fvu.co.uk

Project Partners




Venue Partners




Funded by


Press

Download Press Release

For more information, interviews or images please contact Holly Slingsby at Film and Video Umbrella
holly@fvu.co.uk or 020 7407 7755.
Diary

Exhibitions
PEER
16 September–30 October 2010 Better Bankside Pop-up exhibition space
29 September–10 October 2010

artsdepot
4–15 October 2010
and
18–21 October 2010


Talks & Events
(All part of ‘Making the Cut’)

7 October 8.30pm
Shezad Dawood Ritzy Picturehouse, Brixton

Monday 11th October, 6.30pm
Leo Asemota
Iniva at Rivington Place

Tuesday 12th October, 6.30pm
Jananne Al-Ani
Ritzy Picturehouse, Brixton

Friday 15th October, 6pm
Gayle Chong Kwan
Chelsea College of Art and Design

Sunday 17th October, 1.30pm
Zineb Sedira
The Gate Picturehouse, Notting Hill Gate

Monday 18th October, 6.30pm
George Chakravarthi & Campbell
Iniva at Rivington Place

Wednesday 20th October, 7pm
Ergin Çavuşoğlu
artsdepot

Thursday 21st October, 7pm
The Otolith Group & Mirza and Butler
The Showroom

Monday 25th October, 6.30pm
Sonia Boyce
Iniva at Rivington Place

Tuesday 26th October, 8.00pm
susan pui san lok
Stratford Picturehouse


Accessibility

The Free To Air website has been designed to make it as widely accessible as possible, so that everyone, regardless of ability and technology, can use the website. This page gives information on features included on the site to make this possible.

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS)
We use Cascading Style Sheets to control website page design, along with the size and colour of text. We use CSS as it is not dependent on any additional technologies apart from your web browser or screen reader.

Font sizes and colour
You can set your own preferred styles for font size and colour through your web browser. If you would like to know more on changing these settings, the BBC website has an excellent guide for most modern browsers. Visit the BBC website accessibility page.

Semantic markup
We use semantic HTML markup to aid making sense of page structure. For example, text headings, page content, links and main navigation menu links, are clearly marked up as such.

Design
We have used a common accessible design throughout this website rather than providing text only pages for disabled users. No part of the website is dependent on the use of colour for navigation or conveying content.

Language
We have used plain English in the text content of the website.

Links and navigation
Wherever possible, links are written to make sense when read out of context. Many browsers (such as JAWS, Home Page Reader, Lynx, and Opera) can extract the list of links on a page and allow you to browse the list separately from the page.

Read More

The Free To Air website has been designed to make it as widely accessible as possible, so that everyone, regardless of ability and technology, can use the website. This page gives information on features included on the site to make this possible.

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS)
We use Cascading Style Sheets to control website page design, along with the size and colour of text. We use CSS as it is not dependent on any additional technologies apart from your web browser or screen reader.

Font sizes and colour
You can set your own preferred styles for font size and colour through your web browser. If you would like to know more on changing these settings, the BBC website has an excellent guide for most modern browsers. Visit the BBC website accessibility page.

Semantic markup
We use semantic HTML markup to aid making sense of page structure. For example, text headings, page content, links and main navigation menu links, are clearly marked up as such.

Design
We have used a common accessible design throughout this website rather than providing text only pages for disabled users. No part of the website is dependent on the use of colour for navigation or conveying content.

Language
We have used plain English in the text content of the website.

Links and navigation
Wherever possible, links are written to make sense when read out of context. Many browsers (such as JAWS, Home Page Reader, Lynx, and Opera) can extract the list of links on a page and allow you to browse the list separately from the page.

A Film and Video Umbrella Project
Part 2 of 4
Freedom from Want
September –
October 2010